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July 17, 2009

Why not Bil Keane?

Of course, I wanted to use this clip but it's embedding disabled. At least it's a nice parallel, although for some reason in this case the most trusted man in America would continue to be ignored for another 15 years and counting.

[Not to piggyback on a man's obituary, but if you recently read the NYT anecdote-driven horror story about "new more-potent pot", here's a handily prewritten story about everything that's wrong with it.

Posted by Daniel Radosh

Comments

Don't forget Gordon Waller
http://www.pr-inside.com/asher-honours-late-bandmate-waller-r1396518.htm

HIs last words were, "I don't care what they say, I won't live in a world without Walter Cronkite."

Old Walter led the country into a wallowing sobfest after JFK had his brains blown out in broad daylight rather than investigate or even question whether it was a coup d'etat. Cronkite was just another high-paid regime propaganda shill. Oh yeah, he was a staunch critic of the Vietnam War, after years of mass killing and the tide against Nixon had already swelled. Face it, he was a teleprompter-reading bobblehead, a stentorian foghorn, little more than a Ted Baxter with a brief legitimizing war correspondent past.

Daniel,
I think Paul McCartney said that "please, lock me away, and don't allow the day" was some of the stupidest lyrics he'd ever written (this was before "Uncle Albert") and that's why they gave "World Without Love" to Peter and Gordon.
Of course that may have all been a cover up for his role in killing JFK and expanding the Viet Nam war.

Nothing funnier than totalitarian takeover of a democracy, genocide and slavery. I laughed 'til I plotzed.

Thank goodness for Walter Cronkite keeping us the most informed citizenry on earth. One could say he was the Wolf Blitzer of his time.

As Bill Hicks was fond of saying, "Go back to sleep, America."

(Btw, correction: "... tide against JOHNSON had already swelled," of course.)

Is this another clerihew request?

Walter Cronkite

When angry behind the wheel he couldn't honk right.

Nightly television brought him into our living room,

Perhaps a corner of heaven he'll be given soon.

Every couple of weeks I read a headline stating "World's Oldest Man Dies at the Age of..." And then, presumably, some other poor (old) soul moves up the list for the briefest of times.

With Walter Cronkite's passing, one wonders who is next in line for the title "The Most Trusted Man in America"?

(I think that position has been open for quite awhile now.)

Regis.

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